Money, Money, Money…

Investing in your maker space is a great first step in having a forum for students to nurture their curiosity and inventing skills.  Every maker program has a budget.  Some are more than others but all types of budgets can be used to supply an interactive, hands-on space.

The worst question I get is, “The principal gave me $1500 and I need to set up a maker space.  What should I spend it on?  I have 48 hours!”  I actually had that question last weekend.  Speed spending on a new program in a school, no matter how much money or how much space is a really bad idea.  It leads to tools and supplies that lie dormant for long periods of time in storage areas that are rarely visited while other items of interest languish on a waiting list until another amount of money is available.

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Having a budget and planning to purchase for your maker space takes some time, collaboration and sober second thought.  Ask teachers what projects they are interested in doing and what curriculum connections they are focused on.  This information may help in planning for circuits rather than low tech planet balls.

Planning for design outcomes or prototypes means that teachers should look ahead at possible materials necessary to make inventions inspired by the lesson connections.  Not all eventualities can be accounted for but many materials can be considered basics.

Save some of the money for “consumables.”  Things like batteries, copper wire and low tech making supplies get used up.  Since, generally, the current maker space plans are usually included in the Learning Commons or Library space, it may take a couple of conversations to ensure that consumables are budgeted for.

Technology is not forever.  Even when you purchase kits like littleBits or Hummingbird Robotics  kits, they are useful but also contain consumables and components that break. And, keep in mind, that educational technology kits are a growth industry and new kits are being produced every day.  Even the most thorough researcher may buy a kit that is a clunker.  I know. I’ve done it.  Robotics kits are a fine science. Matching the building skills to make the robot with the coding skills to make the robot work is a beautiful symphony when it is in tune and an expensive mistake when it is a mismatch.

Start small. Make a plan. Save a little aside for consumables. Add what you need.  Collaborate with other teachers and staff.  Rome wasn’t built in a day.

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